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The efficacy and safety of CABLIVI were established in one of the largest aTTP clinical studies1,2

HERCULES Study Design1,2,26,27

A pivotal, phase 3, double-blind, randomized controlled trial of 145 patients with aTTP; patients were given PEX and immunosuppressive therapy in the form of corticosteroid treatment. Other immunosuppressive treatments such as rituximab were permitted but not required.*

Patients were then randomized to receive CABLIVI (72) or placebo (73) for the duration of daily PEX and 30 days thereafter. Patients could receive extended treatment for up to 28 days if signs of underlying disease persist, such as suppressed ADAMTS13 activity levels.1,2

study-design study-design

Key efficacy end points1,2

Study_Design_Icon_01
Primary end point

Time to platelet count
normalization§

Study_Design_Icon_02
Secondary end point

Composite of aTTP-related
events
during study-drug
period, including:

aTTP-related death, recurrence,
and ≥1 major TE event

Study_Design_Icon_03
Secondary end point

Recurrence during
overall
study period

Key characteristics2

key-table key-table

Key Inclusion Criteria: ≥18 years of age; clinical diagnosis of aTTP; required initiation of daily PEX and received PEX prior to randomization.2,27

Key Exclusion Criteria: Platelet count ≥100 × 109/L or >30 × 109/L if serum creatinine level >200 μmol/L; known other causes of thrombocytopenia; congenital TTP, pregnancy, or breastfeeding; clinically significant active bleeding or high risk of bleeding; known chronic treatment with anticoagulant treatment; malignant arterial hypertension; life expectancy <6 months.2,27

*2 patients in each group did not receive any immunosuppressive therapy.

Daily PEX was variable based on platelet count normalization at ≥150,000/μL and physician discretion.27

Thrombocytopenia after initial recovery of platelet count (platelet count ≥150,000/μL) that required reinitiation of daily PEX was considered a recurrence. Recurrences were termed exacerbations if they occurred within 30 days of the last PEX and relapses if they occurred more than 30 days after the last PEX.2

§Platelet count normalization was defined as platelet count ≥150,000/μL with discontinuation of daily PEX 5 days thereafter.2

Other immunosuppressive therapies include, for CABLIVI and placebo respectively: mycophenolate mofetil (6, 0), hydroxychloroquine (2, 1), bortezomib (2, 0), cyclophosphamide (1, 1), cyclosporin (1, 1).

The difference between the trial groups in the percentage of patients who presented with an initial episode as compared with a recurrent episode was significant (P<0.05).2

#The normal range of ADAMTS13 activity used in the trial was 50% to 130%. As a result of the requirement for previous plasma exchange, baseline ADAMTS13 activity was higher than that measured locally at the time of admission in some cases. When available, ADAMTS13 activity levels that were locally measured at the time of admission were obtained, and the lower value of the baseline and admission values is represented.2

ADAMTS13=a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13; aTTP=acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; ISTH=International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis; PEX=plasma exchange; TE=thromboembolic; TTP=thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

IMPORTANT SAFETY
INFORMATION AND INDICATIONS

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

CONTRAINDICATIONS:

CABLIVI is contraindicated in patients with a previous severe hypersensitivity reaction to caplacizumab-yhdp or to any of its excipients. Hypersensitivity reactions have

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IMPORTANT SAFETY
INFORMATION AND INDICATIONS

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

CONTRAINDICATIONS:

CABLIVI is contraindicated in patients with a previous severe hypersensitivity reaction to caplacizumab-yhdp or to any of its excipients. Hypersensitivity reactions have included urticaria.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS:

Hemorrhage:
  • CABLIVI increases the risk of bleeding. In clinical studies, severe bleeding adverse reactions of epistaxis, gingival bleeding, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and metrorrhagia were each reported in 1% of subjects. Overall, bleeding events occurred in approximately 58% of patients on CABLIVI versus 43% of patients on placebo.
  • In the postmarketing setting cases of life-threatening and fatal bleeding were reported in patients receiving CABLIVI.
  • The risk of bleeding is increased in patients with underlying coagulopathies (e.g. hemophilia, other coagulation factor deficiencies). It is also increased with concomitant use of CABLIVI with drugs affecting hemostasis and coagulation.
  • Avoid concomitant use of CABLIVI with antiplatelet agents or anticoagulants. If clinically significant bleeding occurs, interrupt use of CABLIVI. Von Willebrand factor concentrate may be administered to rapidly correct hemostasis. If CABLIVI is restarted, monitor closely for signs of bleeding.
  • Withhold CABLIVI for 7 days prior to elective surgery, dental procedures or other invasive interventions. If emergency surgery is needed, the use of von Willebrand factor concentrate may be considered to correct hemostasis. After the risk of surgical bleeding has resolved, and CABLIVI is resumed, monitor closely for signs of bleeding.

ADVERSE REACTIONS:

The most common adverse reactions (>15% of patients) were epistaxis (29%), headache (21%) and gingival bleeding (16%).

CONCOMITANT USE OF ANTICOAGULANTS OR ANTIPLATELET AGENTS:

Concomitant use of CABLIVI with any anticoagulant or antiplatelet agent may increase the risk of bleeding. Avoid concomitant use when possible. Assess and monitor closely for bleeding with concomitant use.

PREGNANCY:

There are no available data on CABLIVI use in pregnant women to inform a drug associated risk of major birth defects and miscarriage.

  • Fetal/neonatal adverse reactions: CABLIVI may increase the risk of bleeding in the fetus and neonate. Monitor neonates for bleeding.
  • Maternal adverse reactions: All patients receiving CABLIVI, including pregnant women, are at risk for bleeding. Pregnant women receiving CABLIVI should be carefully monitored for evidence of excessive bleeding.

INDICATIONS:

CABLIVI (caplacizumab-yhdp) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (aTTP), in combination with plasma exchange and immunosuppressive therapy.

Please see Full Prescribing Information

Instructions for Use

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Goel R, King KE, Takemoto CM, Ness PM, Tobian AAR. Prognostic risk-stratified score for predicting mortality in hospitalized patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: national representative data from 2007 to 2012. Transfusion. 2016;56(6):1451-1458. 7. Peyvandi F, Scully M, Kremer Hovinga JA, et al. Caplacizumab reduces the frequency of major thromboembolic events, exacerbations and death in patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. J Thromb Haemost. 2017;15(7):1448-1452. 8. Joly BS, Coppo P, Veyradier A. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Blood. 2017;129(21):2836-2846. 9. Masias C, Wu H, McGookey M, Jay L, Cataland S, Yang S. No major differences in outcomes between the initial and relapse episodes in patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: the experience from the Ohio State University Registry. Am J Hematol. 2018;93(3):E73-E75. doi:10.1002/ajh.25002. 10. Schieppati F, Russo L, Marchetti M, et al. Low levels of ADAMTS-13 with high anti-ADAMTS-13 antibodies during remission of immune-mediated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura highly predict for disease relapse: a multi-institutional study. Am J Hematol. 2020;95(8):953-959. doi:10.1002/ajh.25845. 11. Knoebl P, Cataland S, Peyvandi F, et al. Efficacy and safety of open-label caplacizumab in patients with exacerbations of acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in the HERCULES study. J Thromb Haemost. 2020;18(2):479-484. doi:10.1111/jth.14679. 12. Sayani FA, Abrams CS. How I treat refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Blood. 2017;130(14):1684. doi:10.1182/blood-2017-08-803171. 13. Kremer Hovinga JA, Coppo P, Lämmle B, Moake JL, Miyata T, Vanhoorelbeke K. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Nat Rev Dis Primers. 2017;3:17020. doi:10.1038/nrdp.2017.20. 14. Holz J-B. The TITAN trial—assessing the efficacy and safety of an anti-von Willebrand factor Nanobody in patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Transfus Apher Sci. 2012;46(3):343-346. 15. Azoulay E, Bauer PR, Mariotte E, et al; Nine-i Investigators. Expert statement on the ICU management of patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Intensive Care Med. 2019;45(11):1518-1539. doi:10.1007/s00134-019-05736-5. 16. Kremer Hovinga JA, Vesely SK, Terrell DR, Lämmle B, George JN. Survival and relapse in patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Blood. 2010;115(8):1500-1511. doi:10.1182/blood-2009-09-243790. 17. Upreti H, Kasmani J, Dane K, et al. Reduced ADAMTS13 activity during TTP remission is associated with stroke in TTP survivors. Blood. 2019;134(13):1037-1045. doi:10.1182/blood.2019001056. 18. Cuker A, Cataland SR, Coppo P, et al. Redefining outcomes in immune TTP: an international working group consensus report. 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Laurence J, Haller H, Mannucci PM, Nangaku M, Praga M, de Cordoba SR. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS): essential aspects of an accurate diagnosis. Clin Adv Hematol Oncol. 2016;14 Suppl 11(11):2-15. 26. Supplement to: Scully M, Cataland SR, Peyvandi F, et al; for the HERCULES Investigators. Caplacizumab treatment for acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. N Engl J Med. 2019;380(4):335-346. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1806311. 27. Protocol for: Scully M, Cataland SR, Peyvandi F, et al; for the HERCULES Investigators. Caplacizumab treatment for acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. N Engl J Med. 2019;380(4):335-346. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1806311. 28. CABLIVI [instructions for use]. Cambridge, MA: Genzyme Corporation. 29. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Draft ICD-10-CM/PCS MS-DRGv28 Definitions Manual: MDC 8 Diseases & Disorders of the Musculoskeletal System & Connective Tissue Disorders. https://www.cms.gov/icd10manual/fullcode_cms/P0209.html. 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